Resource Reminder

The Tips for Student Success blog many resources available to help you succeed as an online learner! Not only do our weekly blog posts provide you with helpful information, our Tutorials, Blackboard Help, and Additional Resources sections have a wealth of information to support student learning and address specific college-level concepts and skills.

On our Tutorials page you can find short tutorials, ranging from 5 minutes to 25 minutes. Currently we have:

  • What’s the Difference? UAS Online, UAOnline, Webmail Elmo…
  • Getting Started in Your UAS Sitka Course
  • Tips on How to Be An Engaged Online Learner
  • Blackboard: Behind the Scenes
  • Is Online Learning Right for Me?
  • Create Posts in WordPress
  • Edit Your Posts in WordPress
  • Test Taking Tips
  • Basic Grammar
  • Email Etiquette
  • How to Study
  • Note Taking
  • How to Write a Basic Essay
  • Plagiarism – What It is And How to Avoid it

Our Blackboard Help page has tutorials created by the university as well as YouTube tutorials provided by Blackboard.

On the Additional Resources page you’ll find links to tutorials and helpful documentation for:

  • Writing
  • Finding Sources
  • Citing Sources
  • What to Study in a Textbook
  • Learning Styles
  • MS Excel

If you haven’t subscribed to Tips for Student Success yet, consider signing up! You’ll get email notifications when we add more great resources. Don’t worry – we won’t flood your inbox! We post 1-3 times a week and you can choose if you want an immediate or weekly notification.

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/Lucy2014

CRAP!

search the web graphicDid that get your attention? Well, it’s not what you think! CRAP is the acronym for evaluating the credibility of web information: Currency, Reliability, Authority and Purpose. Researching information has become more complex with the increasing amount of information to sort through online. To determine whether or not information is CRAP, ask yourself these questions:

Currency

  • How recent is the information?
  • Does it appear elsewhere under an older date?

Reliability

  • What kind of information is included in the resource?
  • Is the content mostly opinion or fact? Are the two balanced?
  • Does the writer provide references or sources for data or quotations?
  • Is the information source cited or credit given to those who had similar ideas?

Authority

  • Who is the author?
  • Is the writer an expert on the topic?
  • What are the writer’s credentials?
  • Who is the publisher or sponsor?
  • Is the sponsor or publisher reputable?
  • What is the publisher’s interest (if any) in this information?
  • Are there advertisements where the article or blog post appears?

Purpose

  • Is the information fact or opinion? Is the information biased?
  • Is the creator/author trying to sell or persuade the reader of something?

Source: “Is This Information Crap? I Sure Hope So.” wiziq. Web. 4 Aug. 2013.

Scroll through The 3As of A+ Research from Chiara Ojeda below for more information about choosing credible web sources.

Image source: istockphoto.com/marcojavier

Study Effectively in College

Dr. Stephen Chew, professor of psychology at Samford University presents a 5 part videos series on how to study effectively in college. Watch the first video below and follow the links to view the others.

If you use ineffective or inefficient strategies you can study long and hard and still fail, but if you use effective learning strategies you can get the most learning out of your study time.

 

Beliefs That Make You Fail… Or Succeed
In part 1 of 5, Dr. Chew discusses beliefs that sabotage your learning and introduces the concept of metacognition – “a student’s awareness of their level of understanding a topic.”

What Students Should Know About How People Learn
Part 2 discusses shallow processing versus depth of processing. Reading or memorizing without comprehension uses shallow processing, making learning difficult. When you think about meaningful connections while studying you learn whether you intend to or not, this is depth of processing.

Cognitive Principles for Optimizing Learning
In the 3rd video, Dr. Chew explains the basic principles of how people learn and how you can apply the principles to improve your study effectiveness.

Putting Principles for Learning into Practice
In part 4, study strategies based on the learning principles discussed in the series are described. Dr. Chew covers strategies for achieving deep processing, note taking, and group study.

I Blew the Exam, Now What?
In the final video of the series, setbacks are discussed and how you can improve the situation and avoid making it worse.

Quick Note – Chrome Note Taking App

Take notes in Chrome using Quick Note – a lightweight desktop note taking app. It can be used as a notepad, scratchpad, clipboard, or to record todo lists. And it’s free from the Chrome Web Store!

Quick Note is:

  • Quick to add and edit ~ Add note in the app or from right-click menu

  • Quick to search ~ Instant search for all notes

  • Quick to access ~ One-click to access your notes

  • Quick to Sync ~ Sync to cloud and access your notes anywhere

quicknote