Start Your Semester Off Right!

A+ Grade on Homework

Fall semester is right around the corner! Starting your semester off with good habits is easier than trying to break bad habits halfway through. Here are a few tips to help you get off to a great start!

Get organized
Organization play a big role in having a successful semester. Read through your course syllabus and add assignment and due dates to your calendar. Check out our tutorial on Time Management for some tips on finding time, managing time, and avoiding procrastination!

Be realistic about your time
Don’t overcommit yourself. Be cautious about taking on extra responsibilities at home or work, especially if you are taking more than 3 credits.

Take notes
Taking notes is a key part of being successful in college. Taking notes forces you to pay attention to what you are listening to or reading. Not taking also helps you do a better job of remembering what you learn. We’ve created a great tutorial on Note Taking for lectures as well as for reading.

Study!
Successful studying is more than just sitting down with your notes and homework. It takes careful planning as well as specific study techniques. Find out about three keys to successful studying in our How to Study tutorial.

Maintain your health
With classes underway, you should still aim for getting the same amount of sleep every night. It is important to continue to have free time and exercise time. You should add free time and exercise to your daily calendar just as you would an appointment or class assignment. Eating a healthy diet will also help keep you mentally sharp.

Soon you’ll have papers to write and research to do. Be sure to check out our other tutorials on Basic Grammar, How to Write an Essay, and how to avoid Plagiarism.

It’s not too late to register! Search for a Sitka online or on-campus course today!

Questions? Our advisors are happy to assist you!

8 Skills Needed in the Workplace Today

skillsStudent’s take note! Employers in today’s digital era are looking for these eight skills:

  1. Passion for digital
  2. Analytical thinking and application
  3. Critical thinking
  4. Communication skills
  5. Understanding the “bigger picture”
  6. Accountability
  7. Be solution-oriented
  8. Find exceptional mentors to inspire you

Learn more and explore these skills from sources: Edudemic and Educational Technology and Mobile Learning.

Sitka Start

education_roadsign2US News reports: “As many as one in three first-year students doesn’t make it back for sophomore year. Reasons run the gamut from family problems and loneliness to academic struggles and a lack of money. “ So consider doing that critical first year right here in Sitka. Attend class with a cohort of your friends. Save money. Build confidence. Develop good study habits. And then transfer to the college of your choice with a high GPA, no debt, a clear sense of direction… and belief in yourself.

At the University of Alaska Southeast, Sitka Campus, we focus on these ingredients of student success:

  • Full academic accreditation … our credits for GER courses are accepted at most colleges.
  • Excellent professors who care, AND have time for you.
  • Outstanding academic advisors.
  • Free tutoring, plus excellent study opportunities with friends who are taking the same classes.
  • Much lower costs. At less than $5000 per year*, our tuition costs a fraction of most other schools. It is very possible to attend Sitka Campus without debt.

How Sitka Start Works

Beginning Fall Semester 2014 a cohort of Sitka students will go through required Freshman classes together: science, math, English, and electives. To find out more, talk to our Student Success Center advisors. And remember: a good start is the most important ingredient for success in college… and life. Call 747-7717 to get STARTed!

* $5710/year – $1000 Stay on Track Scholarship = $4710 Average Cost

Download the Sitka Start Ad (pdf).

College Goal Alaska

CGAThe UAS Sitka Campus, in cooperation with Sitka and Mount Edgecumbe High Schools, is sponsoring College Goal Alaska! At this event you will:

  • Get free advice on going to college
  • Get help with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
  • Come away with knowing what you need to apply to college on time
  • Get information about the UAS scholarship and application deadline
  • Learn about Sitka Start

When: Tuesday, February 4 at 6 pm
Where: Sitka High School, 1000 Lake Street

If you are unable to attend the event or take classes from a distance, we can still provide you with the information! Call the Sitka Campus student success advisors for information at 907-747-7717.

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/Luseen

Multitasking Makes You Feel Successful But May Hurt Your Productivity

multitaskingMany of us multitask because we are overwhelmed with daily responsibilities at work, home or school. We try to get ahead by working on multiple things at one time. We may write an email, chat online, and carry on a phone conversation all at the same time. But how well are we doing it? Research is showing that multitasking is bad for us and our brains can’t do it! Below are two interesting articles on what researchers are discovering.

Findings from research at Ohio State University “showed that multitasking often gave students an emotional boost, even when it hurt their cognitive functions, such as studying.” They found that people felt more satisfied, not necessarily more productive, when multitasking.

Clifford Nass, a professor at Standford researched Cognitive and Social Effects of Multitasking and stated in an 2010 interview “…in fact, we’re starting to see some higher-level effects [of multitasking]. For example, recent work we’ve done suggests we’re worse at analytic reasoning, which of course is extremely valuable for school, for life, etc. So we’re very troubled about, on the one hand, the growth, and on the other hand, the essential incompetence or failure…” In one experiment Nass was shocked with the results. “It turns out multitaskers are terrible at every aspect of multitasking. They’re terrible at ignoring irrelevant information; they’re terrible at keeping information in their head nicely and neatly organized; and they’re terrible at switching from one task to another.”

So what’s a multitasker to do? One idea is to try organizing your day and activities using a To-Do list. We discussed getting organized, setting priorities and using To-Do lists in our Time Management for Students tutorial. Also, try to limit your distractions. Turn off your phone and TV when you need to study or do homework. Close out of your email program completely during part of your day and respond to emails at set times. I need to try this last one… I’ve been back and forth writing this post all morning because I was responding to emails (and working on another project). This post could have been done in 15 minutes had I just turned everything else off!

Image: ©clipart.com

Get Organized!

School, work, email, social media, chores, family… how do we get it all done? Staying organized helps! Here’s a great infographic from Greatist on How to be the Most Organized Person in the World with quick, useful tips! Also, be sure to check out our short tutorial on Time Management.

organize

(Click on the image to view full infographic.)

Online Learning Tips and College Success Tutorials

plannerWlaptopWelcome back! Start your fall semester off on the right track! Subscribe to the TIps for Student Success blog and receive email notification when we add new tutorials and post great articles about online learning skills and academic success!

Visit the blog’s tutorial page to view short, online tutorials that support student learning and address specific college-level concepts or skills. Current topics are: Plagiarism, Writing an Essay, Basic Grammar, Note Taking, Test Taking Tips, How to Study, Time Management and Email Etiquette. Feel free to leave comments and email us with suggestions for future tutorials or posts. We’re here to help you succeed!

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/WestLight and grebcha

Necessary Skills for Today’s Learners

The 12 Must-Have Skills Of Modern Learners by Jeff Dunn, Edudemic
Skills and Attributes of Today’s Learner
  1. Effective oral & written communication
  2. Collaboration across networks
  3. Agility & adaptability
  4. Grit
  5. Resilience
  6. Empathy & global stewardship
  7. Vision
  8. Self-regulation
  9. Hope & optimism
  10. Curiosity & imagination
  11. Initiative & entrepreneurialism
  12. Critical thinking & problem-solving
educationSkills2
The above list is from User Generated Education (Jackie Gerstein, Ed.D.). Read more about each skill in her blog posts.

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/ymgerman