Stay on Track With These Tools

strike logo Strike App
Strike is a fast, fun list making tool. Your unique list is stored on the web, making it easy to access and share with others!
fetchnotes logo Fetchnotes
Fetchnotes is an easy way to keep track of anything and collaborate instantly. Group notes together with hashtags. Simply put a pound sign (#) in front of any word to add a note to that category. Access anywhere, share with anyone.
dayboard screenshot Dayboard
Replace your new tab page with a daily to do list to focus on your most important tasks each day. Dayboard is a to do list that focuses on just 5 items each day. Start your day by writing down the most important tasks you want to accomplish. Every time you open a new tab, you’ll be reminded of your priorities to help prevent you from visiting distracting sites and stay focused on the task at hand.
Keep logo Google Keep
Quickly capture what’s on your mind and get a reminder later at the right place or time. Speak a voice memo on the go and have it automatically transcribed. Grab a photo of a poster, receipt or document and easily organize or find it later in search. Google Keep makes it easy to capture a thought or list for yourself and share it.

Source: Free Technology for Teachers

Visual Guide to Citing Sources in MLA Format

Another great resource from The Visual Communication Guy!

Visual Guide to MLA Format

How It Works

Using the fan chart and by associating the numbers with the citation parts in the key to the right, you can cite nearly any source in MLA format. Here’s how:

1) Locate the type of source you are trying to cite within one of the four source categories: Books, Periodicals, Online Sources, or Other.
2) Identify the colored thread in the fan chart that is associated with your source.
3) Moving left to right in your source’s column of trapezoids, jot down each number.
4) Use the list below to match the number with the complete citation information for each number. Note: The punctuation in each numbered item is exactly as it should appear in your citation.
5) Fill out your citation in the proper order.

 
You can purchase the 30 x 20 poster by visiting the author’s online store.

Generate Citations with RefME

desktopRefME is a free web and mobile tool to generate citations, reference lists and bibliographies. With REfME you can:

  • Create references with one click
  • Reference in many styles including MLA, APA, and Harvard
  • Scan book and journal barcodes to generate a reference (Get the app in the App Store or Google Play)
  • Store your references in the cloud

Although this tool may make referencing easy, it shouldn’t replace knowing how to create references ‘by hand.’ We have many resources for you on our Additional Resources page under Citing Sources.

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/karnoff

Using Google Books, Scholar and Newspaper Archive

These three tools may help you find more resources than just using a Google.com search!

Google Books allows you to search the full text of books. You can search, browse books online, or buy or borrow books.

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature and helps you find relevant work across the world of scholarly research.

Google Newspaper Archives is an extension of Google News and provides free access to scanned archives of newspapers and links to other newspaper archives on the web, both free and paid.

The three short YouTube videos below were created by Free Tech for Teachers and provide overviews on these tools. Check them out and learn some new search tricks!

A Rough Guide to Punctuation

Sign with punctuation errors

Photo credit: razr_chaos

“Good punctuation is crucial for successful academic writing. Many students’ essays use little punctuation beyond commas and full stops. But to be restricted to just two forms of punctuation mark, when writing your essay, is like building a house using only a hammer and a saw: you can do it; but not very well. By learning to use more, or all, of the available forms of punctuation you will be able to communicate and express your ideas, and arguments, more clearly.”

Learn about the available forms of punctuation in this Rough Guide to Punctuation prepared by The Learning Centre at the University of New South Wales.

For a little more humor, you may want to check out Mashable’s 16 Unfortunate Misuses of Punctuation.